reading360

reading matters, so let's make public library reader services awesome!

Rainbow connection

oscar wildeAuckland Libraries have made it very easy for the rest of us now to promote those books, magazines and films in our collections that feature LGBTIQ characters, and are by or for people who identify as LGBTIQ. Check out their in-depth lists featuring poetry, graphic novels, classics, films, novels, magazines, and nonfiction here.
What other titles could your library add?

To make these visible to your library community, you could:

  • link to Auckland Libraries’ Rainbow Communities page
  • Add the titles to your Goodreads account with links to your libraries’ catalogue
  • create an issuu eBook
  • create a series of bookmarks featuring each section
  • add LGBTIQ-positive websites to your publicly accessible Diigo account so you help people find the information they need (e.g. Headspace Rainbow group, National LGBTI Health Alliance, Wear It Purple, Rainbow Network, Seniors Enquiry Line , etc)
  • share print and online resources with LGBTIQ community groups and ask for recommendations
  • hold and get involved in LGBTIQ-friendly events – from bookclubs, film nights, rainbow groups, and guest speakers to
    gay pride festivals.

Public libraries have a mandate to serve their communities and that includes everyone in them.
State Library of Queensland’s Vision 2017 has some key guiding principles for Queensland public libraries that support our libraries carrying on the good work of Auckland Libraries –

Libraries (page 2):

  • promote the love and value of reading
  • support literacy and learning
  • reflect local context and content
  • nurture community connectedness
  • encourage collaborative partnerships that reach beyond buildings and into community
  • uphold civic values of access, diversity, equity and a culture of inclusion.

This wikipedia article notes the importance of staff education in this area (from Richard Ashby):

  • Training staff to work with diverse populations, specifically LGBTQ patrons
  • Comprehensive and effective collection development policies for LGBTQ materials
  • Librarian education to gain familiarity with publishers or sources for LGBTQ materials, including the utilization of local bookstores or community groups.[1]
  1. Ashby, R. (1987) ‘Library Services to Lesbian and Gay People’, Assistant Librarian. 80 (10): 153–5.

Thank you Auckland Libraries, you’re an inspiration.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: